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20121002
20121010
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CSPAN2 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm EDT
to find a republican operative, a republican elected official, a republican, even inside of romney's own campaign who felt self-confident, who felt confident about their guy. everybody was belly aching. we went up to do some reporting about this fiscal cliff debate on capitol hill? we talked to republicans. republicans talk about the debate like it is a foregone conclusion president obama was going to win re-election. just the mood going in and the mood going out is dramatic to have people actually saying hey, romney our guy. best debate in 20 years are coming from "the weekly standard", by bill kristol who spent the last month being a professional romney critic. >> expectations game moving forward because harder for republicans argue before the next presidential debate and president obama is great orator and romney is so, so. we saw romney give stronger performance. expectations for him will be higher in the next debate. >> james, one of our 10 to 20 reporters we have on the ground at the debate in denver has been in the spin room. he is joining us. hey, homan, forget the romney side of
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
. the first thing is we were in the middle of an election campaign, and candidate bill clinton was comparing beijing to baghdad. and this was right at the time when china was moving from baghdad to paris. maybe i'm overstating the case a little bit, but that's essentially what was happening. i mean, this was a dramatic shift in china, and the u.s. government paid absolutely no attention to it. it had no impact on the policies of the clinton administration when it took office. and, of course, since i was the american ambassador to china this confronted me with problems with an american government that had one view of china, that china was already moving in a different direction, and that created some contradictions in trying to carry out my instructions faithfully. but i think this time, you have something that goes of that. clearly are the bush eli a fair has exposed that china's political system is not different from others. leaders struggle for power. they have their own ambitions. some succeed, some come crashing down, as in the case of bush eli. so we shouldn't assume that just because c
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 8:00pm EDT
to seem unless the debate set the presidential election. it's clear the spt heading toward a environment he has a advantage. romney is going to be exceptional. >> tune in. >> fiewn in and watch. let watch. >> i'm excited. >> talk about in next week in class. >> would you taunt the cross road different and you engage in more localized races congressional and senate how you choose your priorities since so you have a broader scope. >> yeah. that's a good question. we're focused on the presidential election and goal to beat president obama and elect a new president. we are heavily invested in the senate and house race. thing a way about the -- [inaudible] i don't think priority u.s.a. for example -- restore future exclusively dedicated. we're focused on all of the senate races or where you're going do see a lot more of the advertising early your on in the senate races, the bigger the office, the more people pay attention. the we'll be engaged in a number of house races probably a little bit later as we get closer. >> yeah. that's the other thing. the cross roads place outside role in the sen
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 6:00am EDT
, it created a lot of debt we have to pay off. that's kind of our messaging. we try to hold elected officials to account for the record and also for the promises they have made. that's why a lot of incumbents don't like super pacs. >> we have an important note. one of the things we talk about is targeting. living here between new york and philadelphia media market you're not going to see any of these most likely. potentially pennsylvania has been a target state. neither campaign or the super pacs advertising in in sylvania. it's the most expensive market in the target states. i think it's also important to remember, there's a lot of money that is concentrated to a very small number of states and ultimately a small number of people as well. that's something i think is very important. a big part campaign finance reform and the unintended consequences. that's what my pet peeves is the unintended consequences sometimes as well intended legislation. we want to open up to questions. we will give maggie a chance to respond but i didn't want to become the moderator but somehow that may happen. but we
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
that separation? another question that's obvious to raise, especially with an election coming up, is in this any way to cover an election? it's a really good question, and i'm sure the session will spark good conversations, and i hope it will give us some good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program, and we're very, very proud to host it. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
you will have, in fact, that i welcome. this is, we're told, the most important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, 2004 and 2000 or other elections when that is regularly said. for this to be true, though, among other things elections must, in fact, be decisive, with genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. um, we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy. but let me say that my primary interest in the book and in my remarks this evening is much more domestic policy, and can the extent to which elections do or do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic public policy. for the older members in this audience, there has been at least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago. when all of the stars were aligned not only to create a landslide victory for president lyndon johnson -- after all, richard nixon got a l
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 8:30pm EDT
facing a third party candidate in the 2012 election. then live coverage from denver, colorado, for a campaign rally with republican presidential candidate mitt romney. later, president obama rallies with supporters in las vegas. >> tuesday british labour party leader ed miliband delivers remarks in manchester. we'll have live coverage from england here on c-span2 starting at 9:15 a.m. eastern. also tuesday on c-span2, a look at what happens to individual taxes if the bush era tax cuts expire. former congressional budget office director douglas holtz-eakin and other economists look at the issue. our live coverage from the urban institute here in washington, d.c. starts at noon eastern. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children and grandchildren and future generations. we, we were then spending their money, we are now even more, much more, spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal with, and if we are that weak, just think of who wants to come here first and take u
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 2:00am EDT
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11